home about archive rss
The Earnestness of New Social Media Apps »
Permalink

Time is a flat circle and so are narratives about new social media platforms being safe havens for earnestness and authenticity. The newest victim of this cycle? TikTok. Kottke nails it again with the linked post, but had already done once before in 2016:

Blogs, Flickr, Twitter, Vine, and Instagram all started off as places to be yourself, but as they became more mainstream and their communities developed behavioral norms, the output became more crafted and refined. Users flooded in and optimized for what worked best on each platform. Blogs became more newsy and less personal, Flickr shifted toward professional-style photography, Vine got funnier, and Twitter’s users turned toward carefully crafted cultural commentary and link sharing. Editing worked its way in between the making and sharing steps.

Nothing has changed but the names. You can just copy and paste the articles for every newly heralded platform. And when the next platform gets big, the same editing and crafting and overthinking will suck the life from that one, as well.


Media Roundup, November 2018

In an attempt to track and briefly note what I consume, here’s a roundup of (mostly) everything I watched, read, and listened to this month. As the first one, some October is slipping in because there were some goodies I didn’t want to miss. Also, I make no promises of actually doing this every month, but I’m going to try.

Music

La Dispute’s reissue of Somewhere at the Bottom is a master class in honoring an original performance while updating it only for the better. This record defined a lot of my early college years and I’m glad to see a reissue so well cared for. Supergroup boygenius put out their self-titled EP that gets it right by playing to the strengths of all three members throughout. Julien, Phoebe, and Lucy’s output have been amazing separately, but all three together really have come up with something special. My favorite band of all time, Minus The Bear, put out their final EP, Fair Enough, in the middle of October and is still getting regular plays from me. I’m truly heartbroken over their end, but I’m glad they’ve left such an amazing catalog I can bring with me forever. TTNG put out an acoustic reissue of Animals with their original vocalist for its 10th anniversary. Some of the complicated guitarwork falls flat on an acoustic if you aren’t familiar with the electric versions, but I love these songs so much it all works really well for me. JPEGMAFIA put out a new tune with Kenny Beats called “Puff Daddy” with one of my favorite beats of the year. Veteran is my favorite rap record of the year easily and the singles he’s put out since its release have held up just as well. Speaking of Kenny Beats, the new Vince Staples record, FM!, has been on regular rotation since it came out earlier this month. It’s a fun, relaxed effort that let’s Staples show off some interesting flows and wastes no time clocking in at just 22 minutes. I’ve given a few cursory listens to Laura Jane Grace & the Devouring Mothers’ Bought to Rot, but it hasn’t really stuck for me. Lastly, Esperanza Spalding’s 12 Little Spells is an idiosyncratic jazz and pop outing that I find myself coming back to while at work these last few weeks. It’s much more lush and ambient than her previous albums.

TV

I got through a lot more TV than I expected to this month as I started biking indoors for the winter. I wrapped up the new season of Big Mouth and caught up on Steven Universe and The 100, both of which I had left lingering in my queue over the summer. Big Mouth’s potty humor appeals to the immature side of me that I can’t help but cackle at. Steven Universe is continues to dominate animated television, especially post-Adventure Time (RIP, I need to weep about how much I love and miss this show publicly soon) and the expanding world and history they’re creating have only made it better as it’s gone on. The future of that show is bright. I think I’m finally done with The 100 now. The first two seasons were great and it’s all been downhill for me since then. This one finally ended on a concrete enough note that I’m happy wishing it good luck and moving on with my life. I’d still recommend those first two seasons, though. I swung back around to Disenchantment, the new Netflix show from Futurama creator Matt Groening, which was…okay. I feel very meh about the show as a whole, but I’m holding out hope for season two to move things forward. It was a fun watch, but definitely fell short on expectations. I also watched all of Cowboy Bebop for the first time, which I plan to write a lot more about in the coming week. Spoiler for that post, the show is amazing in pretty much every way and its cult status makes sense to me now.

I cut down my weekly queue a good amount this fall, so my list of actively airing shows is down to just South Park, Riverdale, Bob’s Burgers, and Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. I watch South Park mainly out of nostalgia at this point, and this season isn’t really doing anything to change that. The Manbearpig episodes have been a nice moral about-face and making fun of vaping is still funny, but the charm of that show left many years ago. Riverdale I watch mainly because my girlfriend wants to, but boy is that show getting weird (in a good way) this season. Bob’s Burgers still finds a way to be the most lovely, hilarious show, even 9 seasons on. And Crazy Ex-Girlfriend is holding steady as it finds its exit with a final season. What’s nice about the show is that it’s actually attempting to work through and show character’s growing and changing and it shows that progression in an honest, realistic manner.

Movies

I don’t watch a lot of movies, so this area may be sparse most months, but I did watch two Jackie Chan movies this month: Legend of Drunken Master and Rumble In The Bronx. The movies exist with almost zero plot (Rumble literally had no denouement), but that’s not the point: Jackie Chan doing amazing martial arts on screen is and he delivered in both movies. I hadn’t seen any Jackie Chan movies other than Rush Hour and Shanghai Noon prior to this, so it was a fun chance to see some of his earlier work. If you are looking for some easy laughs and awesome stunts, both of these movies were great for exactly that. My intention is to watch Amour of God and Police Story next.

Books

I finished up The Dark Forest, the second book of Liu Cixin’s Remembrance of Earth’s Past trilogy, in late October and started burning through Death’s End immediately after. The Dark Forest ended on a crazy note and Death’s End hasn’t let off the throttle at all. What makes the series so good is the way it balances philosophical problems with big picture science fiction story-telling. I find myself having trouble how good these books are without spoiling the story, so I’ll leave it at that for now. I started Eating Animals because I might eat meat, but I know it’s not the most moral decision I make each day and I want to investigate that feeling more. I’m also reading Extreme Ownership at work. I think the principles it presents are great for any leader to hear and consider how to apply themselves, but all the military stuff sours it for me because I can’t decouple my personal politics from those stories.

Articles

Thrillist’s ‘I Found the Best Burger Place in America. And Then I Killed It.’ is probably the best piece of writing I read this month. It contemplates the power of sharing and The Media™ through a non-controversial lens. “Is it good to share this?,” “Do we have an obligation to?,” and “What are the consequences of doing so?” are questions that don’t bubble up in the era of social media and click-based revenue models. It doesn’t reach too deep into answering those questions directly, but it’s good to see them being considered and I hope this article’s popularity starts more conversations around these questions.

The Atlantic’s exploration of the sex recession brought together a bunch of ideas around dating, romance, sense of self, and a bunch more interpersonal topics I think have been bubbling up for a few years now and made a case around how it’s happening. I’ll be interested to see if the trend continues in the data over the next generation.

There are few things I enjoy more than Current Affairs taking right-wing and centrist schlock to task and Being Mr. Reasonable does a hell of a job on Sam Harris. As always, it’s well-researched and articulates in great detail what makes these moral scam artists so horrific.

I finally got around to Longreads’ piece from back in September, No, I Will Not Debate You. It sharpens a point I’ve been trying to make in my head for a while around the always-dumb debate about civility and giving the microphone to lunatics. It puts a cap on a point I’ve been trying to make in my own head for a while now:

If we deny racists a platform, they feed off the appearance of censorship, but if we give them a platform, they’ve won by being respectfully invited into the mainstream. Either way, what matters to them is not debate, but attention. There is no perfect choice.

Federico Viticci’s explanation of how he uses GitHub for a writing and collaboration workflow on iOS has inspired me to create a platform agnostic notes system using GitHub as my sync server. More on this later, though. I just found the article interesting from a technical ingenuity standpoint.


hail satan Giving this a spin while I spin for the next few weeks.
Permalink

How to Embed YouTube and Spotify on a GitHub Pages Blog

As I’ve been piecing this place together and learning how Jekyll works, I realized I could not figure out how to embed media from across the web, mainly YouTube videos and Spotify songs, albums, or playlists. After a bit of fiddling, I figured out the easiest way was to create standalone files in the _includes folder and then call an include tag on a post when I need to embed something. Here’s how to do it:

YouTube

First, create a file named youtubePlayer.html in the _includes folder and put this code in there:

<iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/{{ include.id }}" 
    width="560" 
    height="315"
    frameborder="0" 
    allowfullscreen>
</iframe>

When you make a post and want to include the embed, call this in your markdown file:


{% include youtubePlayer.html id=page.youtubeId %}

With the above syntax, include “youtubeId: $foo,” where $foo is the youtube video’s id, in the frontmatter of your post. You can also choose to hardcode the youtube video’s id into the snippet like this:


{% include youtubePlayer.html id="4EU7vvSvV-0" %}

I plan to do it the second way. Here’s an example of it in action:

Extra Credit CSS

The above will get you rolling, but I would recommend one more thing: wrap your youtubePlayer.html document in a <div> with a class name (I called mine embed-youtube) and give it this CSS so that the video will properly scale with the device:

.embed-youtube {
    position: relative;
    padding-bottom: 56.25%;
    padding-top: 25px;
    height: 0;
  }

.embed-youtube iframe {
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
  }

Spotify

This operates on the same principles as above, but is a little more complicated because of the different types of media you can share and how that changes the URL. I broke this out into three separate files: one for sharing songs, one for albums, and one for playlists each called spotifySong.html, spotifyAlbum.html, and spotifyPlaylist.html, respectively. You’ll also need to include the CSS I provide below. The embeds don’t look right without it, so don’t skip it.

In each of the files, put the following:

spotifySong.html

<div class="embed-spotify-song">
    <iframe src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/{{ include.id }}"  
        frameborder="0" 
        allowtransparency="true" 
        allow="encrypted-media">
    </iframe>
</div>

spotifyAlbum.html

<div class="embed-spotify-list">
    <iframe src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/album/{{ include.id }}" 
        frameborder="0" 
        allowtransparency="true" 
        allow="encrypted-media">
    </iframe>
</div>

spotifyPlaylist.html

<div class="embed-spotify-list">
    <iframe src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/user/spotify/playlist/{{ include.id }}" 
        frameborder="0" 
        allowtransparency="true" 
        allow="encrypted-media">
    </iframe>
</div>

The main difference here is the source URL, which splits out what you’re embedding. Once you have this set up, like the YouTube link above, you’ll use something like the following in the post you want to embed a Spotify link into:


{% include spotifySong.html id=page.spotifyId %}

And again, like the above, you’ll need to include “spotifyId: ###” in the frontmatter if you use the syntax above or hardcode it and do this:


{% include spotifySong.html id="3V9Ndh1badVfBXnv3niDgE" %}

If you want to embed the album or playlist files instead, just change the include above to spotifyAlbum.html or spotifyPlaylist.html, insert the proper id, and you’re good to go. Here they are in action:

Song:

Album:

Playlist:

Now, for the CSS. Unlike the YouTube embed, this provides core functionality for the embed to display properly, so be sure to include this.

.embed-spotify-song {
  width: 300px;
  height: 80px;
  position: relative;
  max-width: 100%;
}

.embed-spotify-song iframe, .embed-spotify object, .embed-spotify embed {
  position: absolute;
  width: 300px;
  height: 80px;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  max-width: 100%;
}

.embed-spotify-list {
  width: 300px;
  height: 310px;
  position: relative;
  max-width: 100%;
}

.embed-spotify-list iframe, .embed-spotify object, .embed-spotify embed {
  position: absolute;
  width: 300px;
  height: 310px;
  top: 0;
  left: 0;
  max-width: 100%;
}

You can tweak the width/height to your liking, but I selected ones that I thought looked best and then used max-width to make sure there was no overflow. You could also use “margin: auto;” to center them if you’d like. With all that out of the way, you should now be able to embed videos and music with no problem going forward.


Confronting The Numbers

Back in April, I wrote about how I track my entire life using Toggl. I’ve continued to keep up with it, and with a full 10 months of data, I feel like I have enough to discuss the breakdown, how it’s helped me, and where I’m headed with it going forward.

To start, let’s get the numbers up on the board. Looking at January through the end of October, I have tracked 7231 hours. Here’s the breakdown with some highlights pointed out.

The Numbers

Smudging the math a little bit for ease of use, it breaks down to a week that, on average, looks like this:

There are 168 hours in a week and the above add up to 166 hours I have accounted for. Not too bad. I’d probably say the other 2 hours go to fitness and personal projects, which I didn’t account into the math because they were such small numbers.

The Breakdown

So let’s dig into this but first, a caveat: These numbers aren’t literal or scientific and aren’t meant to be. They’re a general overview of where I’ve reported my time to be. The easiest way to explain it is the “sleeping” project: that’s not my actual time literally asleep the way a sleep tracking app would attempt to figure out. I hit the timer when I lay down and turn the lights off, but it doesn’t account for the amount of time it takes me to fall asleep. It’s the same with all of these. Other activities or “dual activities” happen (“Watching” a movie while out with friends is almost always under the “Socializing” task, not the “Watching” task). I’m trying to answer the question “What action am I taking at this moment?” and then report that to myself.

Work and Sleep are both pretty spot on. I work a standard 9-5 and am lucky to have a job I don’t take home with me very often, so with an hour for lunch/break each day (which I change the timer for), 35 looks about right. That total also wouldn’t include several weeks of vacation where I wouldn’t hit the work timer at all, so that would bring it up by another, say, 100 hours (I’ve taken a little over two weeks off at this point). The number is trending toward 38-40 in recent weeks after a promotion in June, but it’s fairly stable around there. As for sleep, 57hr/week equates to eight and a half hours in bed. Taking into account the time it takes to fall asleep, I’m probably averaging 8 hours of sleep every night, which is healthy and about what I expect. I’d like the napping number to trend downward until it’s zero, but other than that, things are stable and healthy in these categories, in my opinion.

The infrastructure number has been enlightening, but also is still a bit vague. Seeing how much I drive has been interesting since I hate driving, so it’s been helpful for my mindset to know where that time is going. It’s even made me hate driving less because I feel like it’s been a reasonable number most weeks, which makes me feel like I’m not losing too much of my life to it. It’s also been interesting to correlate that with my gas expenditure each month in Mint. I spend about $120 on gas every month and average about 30 hours of driving every month, so an hour of driving costs me $4. I’m at peace with that.

“Maintenance” is where the my main pain point arrives. This task has been a black box since I started. It’s what I use in the morning when I am getting ready or in the evenings when I come home from work and when I get ready for bed, but it’s also what I use whenever I did projects around the house or if I was fixing something or putting something together. That just isn’t giving me the insight I want with those two things together.

My intention is to split out maintenance into three new tasks: Daily, Home, and Other. The first two will handle the aforementioned separately now: Daily for any action that is routine and home for “Oh, I need to vacuum or set up these posters or put together a new bookcase or clean out cabinets” sorts of tasks. I think this will cover a majority of my previous “Maintence” tasks, which will be a big win in better understanding Infrastructure as whole, especially how long my daily routines take me. “Other” may not even end up being necessary, but will then become the new, hopefully smaller, black box of infrastructure activities that don’t fit into the above. I’ll reevaluate this decision once some more data has come in and if I still need further refinement.

Entertainment is the most enlightening, but the averages aren’t the interesting part. Watching the trends month-to-month is. The most noticeable one is watching reading come and go in spurts. There’s one month with 30 hours, then the next two slowly trickle down, then another month of 30 hours and then it trickles down again. I’m definitely up-and-down with my relationship with reading and it was valuable to see that play out for me throughout the year. The interplay between them was also fun to watch. As video game playing went up, my television inverted, and vice versa. It obviously showed these as my two main hobbies, and one suffers in time in favor of the other.

The last notable aspect of the entertainment category is the almost perfect curve that my socializing makes. I hibernate a bit in the colder months and find myself much less interested in seeing people and the chart shows this. January through July are a slow climb up as the weather gets nice and now the chart is heading back downward as winter approaches again. I’ll be interested in watching an even longer term trend on this because of one main reason: this September, I moved in with my girlfriend. I’m unsure how to handle using the socializing tag in relation to the time we spend together, but having her right there and joining our lives together certainly makes that tag come up a lot more. In two years’ time, I’ll be interested to see if I maintain the same curve as I’m fairly certain I always have with winter while having a partner around to drag me out of the house.

Onto the bad news. 2018 has been a year where I didn’t take care of myself or move forward with any personal projects. Well, that’s not entirely true and the year isn’t over, but the numbers certainly don’t pan out very well for me. Regarding my fitness, the last few years have seen me gain and lose about 20 pounds each fall (which is happening again right now, but that’s for another post), so I do eventually find time to work out, but it’s almost always after my physical for work in October and then I fall off by the new year, which the evidence lays bare. Almost all of this year, I just didn’t work out. Period. And that’s heartbreaking to have to confront while looking at the numbers to write this post. Getting older isn’t making it easier, but more necessary every year that I keep my shit together. In any case, before I digress further, the numbers being right in front of my face are helpful. I’ve been diligent with my tracking and seeing such a low number is the only signal I need to know I have to crank that number up. I’ve already made strides in the last month, but I have to keep it up this time and make exercise a habit, not a passing trend.

I also didn’t really work on my personal projects this year. I still want to write my own notational velocity clone for Windows, which I’ve made exactly zero progress on. I didn’t write any music. I didn’t even think about trying to podcast. Lots of zeroes on my report card on this front. I did start this blog, though. It’s been slow going, but I’m feeling a bit of momentum lately. I’ll call it a win even if I’m just hitting double-digit posts on here at the time of writing. I’m starting to have and jot down more ideas on a regular basis and that’s inspiring me to keep going. I also must admit that a lot of my writing is done during down time at work–including this very post–and I rarely switch my timer for that, so there is definitely missing data here. I still haven’t written a lot, but it’s a start.

How It’s Helped Me

Having data brings me clarity. I trust it. I’m skeptical of data in a vacuum or used as an ideology, but my process-oriented, planner brain craves it. Digging through these reports has made me be honest with myself because I have faith in the numbers. I’m not happy about all of these numbers and sharing them is scary. Who wants to tell people they’ve spent 800 hours playing video games this year? Not me. But it is the undeniable truth of who I am, and all I can do is work with that and put effort into changing the numbers and continuing to be honest with myself about them as the months go on. So just having access to all this data in a digestible format has been helpful in and of itself.

I get a weekly report email from Toggl with my numbers from the previous seven days and it’s been a helpful nudge to reflect on last week’s choices in a concrete way that resonates with me. I definitely found myself reacting to the numbers every week and changing my behavior based on it. Sometimes I let myself slag off and not care when I saw “45 hours” on my video game line item, but most of the time I took a second to figure out what suffered because of that and being forced to confront it every week has been a really helpful tool for me.

Concrete Goals

Knowing there’s work to do, I wanted to publicly document a few things I want to commit to changing over the next year:

Looking Forward

I’m honestly really happy with the process side of things that I have stood up. I feel like my categories are pretty solid once I work out the kinks with the “Maintenance” task and Toggl’s iOS 12’s Shortcuts are going to make this easier than ever to handle. From here, it’s all about continuing to keep at it and put more focus on having an active mindset each and every day about changing the numbers to be where I want them to be.


hail satan vote democrats into office.
Permalink

this is a server »
Permalink

I hang out on Discord playing video games quite a bit. The old server I used is gone, so I stood my own up. If you want to come chat or play video games, feel free to stop by.


Apple Cider

I ground up some apples last week and pressed them into cider. It was a deeply satisfying (and delicious) project. I had never made cider before, but I’m lucky to have a friend who grows his own apples and was willing to lend me his press and a little knowledge to help me along. It was really quite easy: Chop up the apples, throw them in a food processor, put them in a barrel, and press them down, and voilà, cider.

Weirdly, the simplicity caught me off guard. When I went to drink the cider, it tasted, well, exactly as I knew apple cider tasted. I had always figured store bought cider had something more complicated in its process, but, no, apple cider was completely demystified for me. I often feel like this when creating something for the first time. Not everything has a magical, complicated process that’s beyond my reach of figuring out if I just try it. What was important about this moment for me was that it reminded me of the value and enjoyment of trying new things and doing it yourself.

The complacency of adulthood is digging its claws into me a bit these days and the cider incident has been a bit of an emotional jolt reminding me that breaking out of that cycle is fun and good. It’s easy to rely on the comfort foods I’ve built up for myself. Playing Destiny, watching television shows and movies, listening to the same 15 podcasts every week, cooking with my girlfriend after work, playing D&D on Thursdays. These things work for me. They’re consistent and bring order to my life. But, if I let the sameness of life takeover, I’ll never learn and grow in the ways I tell myself I want to. I’ll certainly never make headway on the big goals I have in my head like biking across America or walking the Appalachian Trail.

Apple cider will always be a reminder to get a little uncomfortable. Not everything is scary or difficult. Life can be fun and new and an adventure in small ways every day if you let it. Go out and demystify the world, one batch of cider at a time.


Capital, Distance, and 'Sorry to Bother You'

This post contains major spoilers for the movie ‘Sorry to Bother You’ from sentence one, so please stop reading now if you don’t want the movie spoiled for you.

Sorry to Bother You’s twist reveals that WorryFree CEO Steve Lift is transforming workers into horse-human hybrids because it will make them “stronger, more obedient, more durable, and therefore, more efficient and profitable.” This quote comes from a promotional video WorryFree has put together to pitch the idea and Lift is showing it to protagonist Cassius Green in an attempt to calm him down after discovering the equisapiens and convince him to become one himself for $100 million. In this scene, the movie’s central political critique is laid bare: Capitalism breeds a worldview that believes efficiency, obedience, and profit are intrinsically moral principles.

Lift tells Cassius he wants to show him the video to prove he isn’t “doing this for no reason” and that the idea—which, to reiterate, is performing gene modification on humans to turn them into half-horses—”isn’t irrational.” When Cassius pushes back and asks in a horrified voice if he’s doing this “so you can make more money,” Lift’s response is a flippant “Yeah, basically.” To Lift, needing any more justification beyond profit is the absurd idea being presented. He couldn’t possibly conceive of any further rationale needed because profit is the ultimate moral good in his eyes.

We live in a world where Amazon warehouse workers piss in bottles instead of using a bathroom so they don’t miss their quota of boxes filled during a shift and get fired. Here, the value of efficiency and profit is placed above that of human dignity. The quota is in service of spreadsheets and charts, humans be damned. The same way Lift only needs to rationalize a policy of gene modification in the name of profit, so do the capitalists of our own world rationalize dehumanizing workplace practices to satisfy the charts and spreadsheets they’re tracking. As long as the numbers are headed in the right direction, that’s the end of the discussion.

In this way, Sorry to Bother You’s critique rings true because it doesn’t mischaracterize the motives of capitalists. It doesn’t try to pull any punches or lean on lazy interpretations of free market ideologies. Lift’s plan may be absurd, but his rationale for doing it is straight from the mouths of any businessman in America right now.

What makes this worldview a moral nightmare is that it’s dehumanizing. Abstracting humanity into data points to manipulate in the name of profit is the ultimate embrace of “the ends justify the means.” As long as the ends are seen as good in a vacuum, the means and their effects are never even considered. To obfuscate humanity behind the data creates an impersonal distance between all of us and validates the mistreatment of each other while feeling self-righteous about doing it. It creates men like Steve Lift who are confused and insulted when asked to provide more rationale for taking action than it making them more money. And it creates corporate bureaucrats who are incentivized to punish workers so a line on a graph looks better to their boss.

This particular brand of western, corporate capitalism explored in the movie has been argued as the end of our ideological evolution for almost 30 years. It can feel overwhelming to just accept the homogenous, numbing oppression of Steve Lift types that will lord over us and to just get in line, work the charts, and shut up, with the exact docile obedience Lift wants from the equisapians. But Sorry to Bother You leaves hope for us to move beyond this so-called end of history. In the movie’s climax, the equisapians are released and fight back, mirroring the idea of a proletarian revolution.

Corporate capitalism doesn’t have to be the end of history, and we don’t have to create impersonal, dehumanizing relationships between ourselves based on shallow, selfish justifications. We can create a moral vision of optimism and hope. There is a space in this world for that flower to bloom and Sorry to Bother You is one raindrop on that seed.


Raindrops

Due to the current political climate and my burgeoning leftism, I’ve been revisiting Saul Alinsky’s Rules for Radicals this week. During the prologue, he quotes a snippet from a letter John Adams wrote in 1818 that I find useful right now:

“The Revolution was effected before the war commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people…This radical change in principles, opinions, sentiments, and affection of the people, was the real American Revolution.”

I’m plagued by fear and self doubt every time I pick up a pen, but Adams’ quote reminds me that discourse is an important part in changing the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of others so we can create a climate where revolutionary ideas can grow. To do that, I can’t let myself get hung up by my shortcomings. I’d never publish anything or help create the change I so badly want to see in the world.

No raindrop pleads guilty to causing the flood, but we do need a lot of raindrops to make that flood. So write your hot takes and your takedowns and your think pieces and your diatribes — write your truth, whatever that is. Your ideas are valuable and matter and can change the world, one raindrop at a time.